Australian lawyer points out a very related flaw with Apple’s new iPhone iOS 16 update

A Sydney etiquette expert has uncovered potential flaws in the latest Apple iPhone iOS 16 update – including social mistakes and miscommunication.

The new software allows users to unsend any message up to two minutes after sending and edit it up to 15 minutes after sending the message.

Julie Lamborg-Burnett, founder and CEO of the Sydney School of Protocol, told FEMAIL that all iPhone users should be wary of text messages sent to avoid confusion that could potentially damage relationships.

While having the ability to edit text messages to correct grammatical errors is important to ensure that the message is understood.

“Digital messages can often be misinterpreted and the added functionality for editing and deleting opens up more opportunities for creating mixed perceptions and affecting your reputation,” Julie said.

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Apple iPhone iOS 16 update allows users to unsend any message up to two minutes after sending and edit it up to 15 minutes after sending the message.  Julie Lamborg-Burnett said this can lead to social inaccuracies and miscommunication between relationships (stock image)

Apple iPhone iOS 16 update allows users to unsend any message up to two minutes after sending and edit it up to 15 minutes after sending the message. Julie Lamborg-Burnett said this can lead to social inaccuracies and miscommunication between relationships (stock image)

‘It’s an interesting point and in essence the tools are useful to be able to replace potentially hurtful or embarrassing comments,’ Julie continued.

‘However, this only serves to remind all of us that we must make sure that we are both careful about committing our thoughts to messages and if we review what we have written before sending it to the press. And tend to spend extra time editing.

With the added tools on iOS iPhones, we need to pay more attention to how we’re handling messages to avoid confusion, sending mixed signals, and potentially relationships on both a business and personal level. are affecting.’

To avoid any potential embarrassment or confusion, Julie recommends keeping messages brief and calling someone instead of texting when needed.

He also highlighted the fact that not everyone has the time to scroll through message threads and read whether something has been edited or deleted.

“If you have doubts about the information you want to convey, call or speak in person,” she said.

‘In addition, avoid sending confidential, embarrassing or personal information messages.’

Due to the nature of texting, it is easy to misinterpret a message and this can lead to misunderstandings.

Tips to improve your digital messaging:

When sending a message to someone, make sure that:

Be careful not to have time to scroll through messages to check the thread of messages

Keep messages concise to remove the need to edit or delete media

If you are in doubt about the information you want to call or talk to in person

Avoid sending confidential, embarrassing or private information messages

Promote face-to-face communication in business and social settings

A Sydney lawyer pointed to another potentially fatal flaw in the latest Apple iPhone iOS 16 update.

in tiktok Video Criminal defense lawyer Jahan Kalantar said he was “apprehensive” of the impact the facility could have on the legal system and what it could mean in terms of “modifying evidence”.

The latest update launched on September 12 in Australia and most countries around the world.

Sydney criminal defense lawyer Jahan Kalantar (pictured) in a TikTok video points to a potentially fatal flaw in the new Apple iPhone iOS 16 update.

Users can now unsend or edit text messages, leading Mr Kalantar to question its impact on the legal system (stock image)

Sydney criminal defense lawyer Jahan Kalantar (left) in a TikTok video points to a potentially fatal flaw in the new Apple iPhone iOS 16 update. Users can now unsend or edit text messages, which Mr Kalantar has questioned the impact on the legal system.

‘Apple just released a feature that scares me as a criminal defense attorney. In my opinion, this feature has the most powerful potential for miscarriage of justice that I have ever seen,’ Mr Kalantar said in the clip.

He spoke about the latest feature and the ability to ‘make people modify evidence’.

“Imagine what it can do in terms of enabling people to make threats and then change them so that they seem harmless,” Mr Kalantar continued.

‘What about a series of evidence issues? Will we know whether there have been changes or not?’

Mr Kalantar said he is already preparing himself to argue as to the ‘verifiable legitimacy of anything that comes from an iPhone’.

Jahaan’s informative video has since garnered over 412,000 views, garnering over 22,000 likes.

‘Thanks Jahan, I was already moving away from apple then you go and post this. Decided,’ wrote one person.

Others pointed out that the edit history should be accessible and that screenshots should always be taken.

One person wrote, ‘There will be full forensic traceability for the messages/images sent (as usual).

Another said, ‘You can see the edits you made, Apple thought about it.’

A third wrote: ‘Screenshots from all day! We will need more storage in the phone.

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